PR Tips: How to Prepare for a Media Interview

 

Proper preparation can help you make the most of a broadcast or print interviews.

Message Points: In preparing for a media interview, the first step is to develop communications objectives- two or three key points you wish to convey to your audience. You might want to discuss the benefits of your company, or other points directly related to your marketing objectives.

Rehearse. We can’t stress how important it is to rehearse responses to all possible questions. Simulate interview sessions with the help of a friend or a professional media trainer. Rehearse out loud. Vocalizing your responses will help to file the messages in your “mind’s ear.”

Preview your interviewer. If she is a TV news reporter, watch some of her broadcast interviews. If he is a newspaper reporter, read some of his articles so that you are comfortable with his interviews style.

Short Words – Simple Sentences. This creates an air of informality and the illusion of casual conversation between you and the reporter. A natural, informative quality also makes you more believable.

Learn how to “bridge.” When an interviewer asks a question that sidesteps your key points, regain control by bridging from the topic broached back to your key line of reasoning or point.

Avoid “Off the record.” The phrase “off the record” is an overused and misused tool not recommended for the average interviewees. Your interviewer will probably bristle if you offer information and then plead, “But this is ‘off the record.’ Say what you have to say in an authoritative manner and you will automatically convey a sense of expertise and knowledge about the topics.

Non-verbal cues. The spoken word is only a small part of the communications process. We all know that direct eye-to-eye contact connotes a sense of candor and honesty. That’s just one way in which non-verbal cues can work in your favor. In addition to the unspoken cues, you should also be aware of your voice and your body language. Be natural and as relaxed as you can be under the circumstances.

Have fun!

How to Generate PR During your Crowdfunding Campaign

 

When you read the Kickstarter stats it can be depressing: the rate of success is only 38.13%–that means that 61.87% fail.  Why? With 228,894 launched projects in the past 12 months it’s really difficult to break through and gain visibility.  So what can you do to help generate a buzz and create top-of-mind awareness on Kickstarter?

 

Statistics show that those who hire a public relations agency are often more successful in establishing awareness and getting their products funded.  But if you can’t hire an agency, then become your own publicist.

  • If you build it they will come. Creating a launch-worthy product takes time and effort—and so does promoting it. If you build it they will come is untrue in the crowdsourcing world.  You have to take your information to the media and the influencers.  Working hard at creating a prelaunch buzz should be your goal from the minute you decide to go with a crowdsourcing campaign.
  • Develop a media kit. You have to make it easy for a reported to find and help you. Create a one-page press release on your project, a high-resolution photos, a list of what makes your project so compelling and unique and a screenshot of your campaign.
  • Develop your media lists. If too intimidating, you can hire a freelancer to find the blogs and writers related to your project. And don’t be intimidated about picking up the phone and calling your local newspapers, radio and TV stations and pitching your story; local media can be your best supporters.
  • Social media. Create a Facebook and Twitter pages as well as Instagram and  Explore some advertising on an outlet such as Facebook where, for just a few dollars a day, you can increase your visibility and promote your Kickstarter campaign.
  • Crowdsourcing PR sites. Here are 7 free tools to help generate a buzz before you launch a crowdfunding project:
    1. it. According to Wikipedia Thunderclap is a “crowdspeaking” platform that lets individuals and companies rally people together to spread a message. The site uses an “all-or-nothing” model similar to crowdfunding sites such Kickstarter, in that if the campaign does not meet its desired number of supporters in the given time frame, the organizer receives none of the donations.
    2. Pitchfuse. Using the service, you can post your up and coming Kickstarter or Indiegogo project and receive comments, collect email addresses, analyze pageviews, and accumulate followers. You can also notify your followers when you do launch.
    3. Working on the principal of “social currency,” this site taps into the collective influence of the crowd to gauge a project’s popularity. The more crowdcredits you acquire, the higher your ranking on this site and the more likely you are to become a trending project.
    4. This is where you post that press release that you created. After posting it on this site you can copy and paste it on your blog or website, and you can even attach it to your press release when you distribute to media outlets.
    5. This is where you post information on your pre-launch campaign—it’s a “coming soon” platform that helps you create awareness and gather supporters early on.
    6. You can create a pre-launch landing page where you can collect email addresses of potential backers.
    7. Here’s a quick and easy place to start your blogging efforts.  It’s a channel for reaching out to other bloggers, for explaining your campaign, for sharing your goals as well as your frustrations and lessons learned.

Good luck!

 

How to Explain PR to Your Father

 

For those of you who have recently graduated from college and have had the good fortune of landing a job in a public relations agency, congratulations.  But now comes the hard part; trying to explain to your family and friends what you do for a living.

I remember many years ago when I landed my first job in a New York-based public relations agency and tried to describe over the phone to my Philadelphia parents exactly what it was that I was tasked to do.  Observing that my parents were still uncertain of my exact talent, I decided to bring my impressive portfolio of all earned media content (aka placements) and make a formal presentation to them in Philly.

At the time, one of my clients was Mannington flooring covering. Part of my job was to get editorial coverage of its flooring in top-targeted national magazines, and I had done an admirable job.  My portfolio was filled with placements from the likes of Better Homes and Gardens, Good Housekeeping, House Beautiful, Metropolitan Home, Woman’s Day, Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar.

It took the better part of an hour, but I made a formal presentation to my parents explaining how I developed a media list and a pitch letter. I went on to describe the time-consuming process of engaging the editor in my idea and what it took to close the deal.  Then with pride, I took them through my bulging portfolio and explained the process involved in obtaining each and every glossy magazine article.

They smiled and nodded in what I assumed was recognition of the time consuming, long drawn out process and its results…the placement. I even went so far as to explain the difference between earned media and purchased media (advertising), and again they nodded in recognition of the perceived difference.

They seemed duly impressed and I was relieved that I had so admirably explained what I did for a living.

Then, a few weeks later, there arrived an envelope from my father containing the ripped out full page advertisement from Mannington floorcovering with a little hand-written note at the top, “Great job, darling.”

And my parents were not the only ones who were confused with what I did for a living. Throughout my life, whenever I was asked what I did for a living, and replied “public relations,” you could count on it that within a brief time, if the social situation allowed, the person would invariably turn and query, “Isn’t that like advertising?” To which I am now forced to reply, “Exactly.”  I surrender.

 

9 PR Best Practices for Corporate Blogging

 

Blogging can be a great opportunity for some organizations and brands to enter the social media world and thereby put their best foot forward on behalf of their company/product.  But before you jump head first into the blogosphere it is important to develop a strategy that helps present you in the best light while also grabbing the attention of your target audience.  Here are a few start-up tips:

  1. Grab their attention. Nowadays it seems that everyone has taken to the Internet with an opinion, 10 tips or guidelines. Make sure that you start off your blog with something that is relevant to your audience and will make them want to continue reading. You’ve only got a few sentences in which to grab their attention. Make it worth their while to stay.

 

  1. Use bullets or numbered lists. Everyone loves a list whether it is 10 tips, bullets or just visually pleasing in the layout.  You are competing for everyone’s time and attention spans are waning, so the setup of you blog is very important.

 

  1. Develop keywords.  For search engine optimization (SEO), your keywords matter especially in the title as well as the tips themselves.

 

  1. Use hyperlinks. In addition to using strong keywords, the use of hyperlinks aids tremendously in spreading your blog post throughout the Internet.

 

  1. Write about what you know. Everyone is an expert in his/her field so use this platform wisely. Learn how to teach others, how to arrange and present your thoughts in an organized fashion.

 

  1. Provide advice. Position yourself as the guru or specialist in your field. With experience comes knowledge and it is important to pass this knowledge along to others. Blogging offers a perfect outlet.

 

  1. Drive traffic. Blog through other social media outlets such as Twitter and Facebook

 

  1. Watch your length. Blog posts are 250-600 words long according to the industry-accepted standard. The more frequently you post, the shorter your post should be.

 

  1. Keep the posting schedule consistent. I try to post regularly on my blog so that followers will look at the site as a go-to place for insights from the president of a New York public relations agency.