How to Generate PR During your Crowdfunding Campaign

 

How to Generate PR During your Crowdfunding Campaign

When you read the Kickstarter stats it can be depressing: the rate of success is only 38.13%–that means that 61.87% fail.  Why? With 228,894 launched projects in the past 12 months it’s really difficult to break through and gain visibility.  So what can you do to help generate a buzz and create top-of-mind awareness on Kickstarter?

Statistics show that those who hire a public relations agency are often more successful in establishing awareness and getting their products funded.  But if you can’t hire an agency, then become your own publicist.

  • If you build it they will come. Creating a launch-worthy product takes time and effort—and so does promoting it. If you build it they will come is untrue in the crowdsourcing world.  You have to take your information to the media and the influencers.  Working hard at creating a prelaunch buzz should be your goal from the minute you decide to go with a crowdsourcing campaign.
  • Develop a media kit. You have to make it easy for a reported to find and help you. Create a one-page press release on your project, a high-resolution photos, a list of what makes your project so compelling and unique and a screenshot of your campaign.
  • Develop your media lists. If too intimidating, you can hire a freelancer to find the blogs and writers related to your project. And don’t be intimidated about picking up the phone and calling your local newspapers, radio and TV stations and pitching your story; local media can be your best supporters.
  • Social media. Create a Facebook and Twitter pages as well as Instagram and  Explore some advertising on an outlet such as Facebook where, for just a few dollars a day, you can increase your visibility and promote your Kickstarter campaign.
  • Crowdsourcing PR sites. Here are 7 free tools to help generate a buzz before you launch a crowdfunding project:
    1. it. According to Wikipedia Thunderclap is a “crowdspeaking” platform that lets individuals and companies rally people together to spread a message. The site uses an “all-or-nothing” model similar to crowdfunding sites such Kickstarter, in that if the campaign does not meet its desired number of supporters in the given time frame, the organizer receives none of the donations.
    2. Pitchfuse. Using the service, you can post your up and coming Kickstarter or Indiegogo project and receive comments, collect email addresses, analyze pageviews, and accumulate followers. You can also notify your followers when you do launch.
    3. Working on the principal of “social currency,” this site taps into the collective influence of the crowd to gauge a project’s popularity. The more crowdcredits you acquire, the higher your ranking on this site and the more likely you are to become a trending project.
    4. This is where you post that press release that you created. After posting it on this site you can copy and paste it on your blog or website, and you can even attach it to your press release when you distribute to media outlets.
    5. This is where you post information on your pre-launch campaign—it’s a “coming soon” platform that helps you create awareness and gather supporters early on.
    6. You can create a pre-launch landing page where you can collect email addresses of potential backers.
    7. Here’s a quick and easy place to start your blogging efforts.  It’s a channel for reaching out to other bloggers, for explaining your campaign, for sharing your goals as well as your frustrations and lessons learned.

Good luck!

Tips for PR Pros on Pitching Journalists Via Social Media

 

Tips for PR Pros on Pitching Journalists Via Social Media

Social media offers an opportunity for PR agencies to reach out to journalists in a more intimate space. But beware—not all channels offer appropriate outcomes.

There are right and wrong ways to use social media to query reporters, because you don’t want to come across as a stalker to a reporter. Here are a list of the Do’s and Don’ts for PR professionals of approaching reporters on social media.

Don’t:

  1. Don’t pitch journalists through Facebook.
  • Facebook is a place for friends. Even though Facebook has become a place for business too, journalists consider Twitter a professional tool, not Facebook. Also, when you message someone you aren’t friends with on Facebook, it goes into their “other” folder, which often goes unchecked. Avoid posting on their wall or to pictures to get noticed– journalists want to maintain some privacy on their Facebook page.

 

  1. Don’t mass pitch reporters on Twitter
  • Remember, when your tweet can be seen by everyone. Don’t try to get noticed by a lot of reporters at once by pitching multiple accounts at once through tweeting. As soon as you pitch a journalist, they will likely click on your Twitter profile to learn more. If the reporter sees that the last several tweets are copied and pasted to different multiple people, they will lose interest quickly.

 

  1. Don’t contact another journalist to get his colleague’s information
  • It’s unprofessional to contact a reporter to get through to another one. Even though one reporter might have less followers than another, and it might be easier to see a @mention with that person, reporters are being pitched all the time—so they don’t need to be bothered with  a PR person trying to reach their colleague through them.

 

  1. Don’t follow up more than once
  • The point of pitching on social media is to keep it short and sweet. If you follow up more than once, reporters will automatically mark you as spam and you won’t be able to contact them in the future.

Do:

  1. Find out the reporter’s beat before you pitch them
  • It’s your job to do the research and theirs to determine your pitch’s relevance to the audience and publication. You can find this out by seeing what the reporter is tweeting or retweeting, and also by investigating their bio; it will usually say what topics they are interested in or what their beat is.

 

  1. Use Twitter to pitch
  • Twitter forces PR pros to keep their pitches short and catchy. It is okay to pitch journalists through Twitter because they treat their accounts as an extension of their reporting, so they might be more willing to chat with you on Twitter about topics relating to their beats. When pitching reporters on Twitter, @mention the company you are working for and a link to some news–if they recognize the organization they maybe more likely to respond.